Episode 196 Snippets: How The Athletic’s Vast Volume of Quality Stories Translates to Social Engagement

On episode 196 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Olivia Witherite, Manager – Social Engagement, The Athletic

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 196: Olivia Witherite on Telling Sports Stories for The Athletic’s Social Media

Listen to episode 196 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Olivia Witherite, Manager – Social Engagement, The Athletic.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

63 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

Know Your Goals: What it Means to have a Craft and Execute Effective Social Media Strategy

Social media is easy, right? It’s the vocation of iNtErNs, after all. Everybody knows how to post content on social media, almost everybody has posted on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. etc.

But don’t let the accessibility and ‘fun’ nature of social media obscure the fact that it can and should be an integral part of business strategy. A thoughtful, effective social media strategy can create and build brands, can cultivate and activate audiences, and can make or break the short-term and long-term success for an organization, campaign, and balance sheet.

The key to understanding social media strategy — the key to understanding just about anything — is asking ‘why?’. Why should a business or brand post on social media? Sure, more followers, more engagement, and more attention is usually not a bad thing; the whole ‘all publicity is good publicity’ epigram at play. But it’s at the next level where professionals reside. Where there’s a method to the madness. David Brickley, founder and CEO of STN Digital, a ‘social-first’ marketing agency talked about the importance of understanding the why of it all.

Brickley explained: “That’s the big thing that we help do is [define] ‘What’s our core purpose?” What’s our mission? What’s our North Star? What are our brand pillars? What audience are we trying to attract? Where do they live?’ 

“All those things I think sometimes get left behind and people just start posting content or ‘let’s grow to a million followers;’ [it’s] like, ‘Wait a second. Do you want a million followers that are more the Gen Z demographic? Do you want a million followers that are more 35 to 54 [age range]?’ That’s an important distinction to make before you just start creating content because you want to attract the right viewers that ultimately, from an ROI perspective, can purchase your product or tune into your television network or what have you…

“[Otherwise] how do you know if you’re successful or not?”

It can be challenging, however, to work toward strategic objectives when the giant scoreboard often equates performance with the vanity metrics. Social media goals can’t be defined by some vanity metric without context and forethought. This is what separates the ‘anybody can do social’ strategy from the pros. Brickley walked me through a scenario in which the vanity metrics scoreboard didn’t necessarily tell the whole story.

“We have some clients that really want to increase their Gen Z demographic (or) they really want to increase Latinx or their Black audience,” said Brickley, who has overseen STN Digital working with some of the biggest names in sports and entertainment. “So those are the things that we’re looking at — is our Gen Z audience that’s only 17% this month, can we get it up to 18% next month? So we may lose [net] followers, but if we lost, no offense, the 54 to 65 year old demo, and we gained a bunch of 18 and 22 year olds [then] that’s actually a win, even though the net score looks like we lost followers this month.

“So we work with a lot of brands that are trying to re-identify themselves, or they have a new initiative from the top down saying we need to get younger or we need to get more diverse audiences and consumers. And those are the things that we look at rather than maybe your traditional vanity metric, which is followers.”

Sometime in the early days of digital advertising, marketers began tracking return on investment (ROI). After years of billboards, TV commercials, and radio ads that largely lacked direct ROI measures, digital offered more insight than ever. And then social media arrived on the heels of digital and those direct ROI measures were expected, too. But just because new mediums arose, the marketing funnel itself didn’t disappear. Customers are rarely created with a single ‘impression.’ And expecting every social media post to have a directly attributable ROI is missing the forest for the trees. Brickley broke down the framework with which to look at social media (and, really, to look at for any form of marketing).

“I think [what] frustrates some marketers is they can’t attribute ROI immediately,” Brickley explained. “But there’s such a thing as upper funnel and lower funnel marketing. And a lot of what social is is upper funnel and awareness. And then you can kind of drill that consumer down to take action in the lower funnel.

“But we have clients that say this all the time — they want to go straight to lower funnel. But if you haven’t built education, if you haven’t built rapport, if you haven’t built brand loyalty or brand trust with something, it’s gonna be very difficult to have (somebody) buy a car if you’ve never heard of that car before.”

Customer acquisition, even with the help of social media, is nonlinear. The most valuable ‘engagement’ happens off-platform and the most valuable part of the social media marketing funnel often can’t be found in the metrics. The highest demonstration of success isn’t direct attribution of a social media post to a sale or conversion — it’s inspiring a current customer (or follower) to evangelize and convert their friends and family. To turn one follower into fifty and truly activate the network effect of social networking. The focus can’t always be on finding the next customer or follower when the surest path to doing so is augmenting the avidity of the existing ones [and to ensure they don’t unfollow, because all it takes is a quick click].

 “I think your goal as a brand is to continually engage [and] evoke emotion from your current audience, but also attract a new audience,’ said Brickley. “How do you attract a new audience? Well, you gotta have your current followers reshare your content. Maybe they DM their friends this content. I’ve been a big golfer here for the last year or so because of COVID and my friends are constantly sending me fun golf memes…And all of a sudden, I start following those accounts because I enjoy the content they’re putting out. So that’s one way to acquire a new fan.

“But absolutely once you get those hundred thousand followers, it’s your job to keep those followers. I was talking to Lyndsay Signor over at NBC Sports — I think she said this on my podcast: ‘You know, they don’t have to follow you, right? At any time someone can unfollow you.’…”

So, putting it all together, social media strategy targets specific goals while staying true to brand purpose while attracting new followers and fostering current ones while keeping up with the ever-changing nature of platforms, user behaviors, and online culture in which they operate.

Okay, on second thought, maybe it’s not so easy, after all.

LISTEN TO MY FULL CONVERSATION WITH DAVID BRICKLEY

Episode 195 Snippets: Crafting a Social Media Strategy for Sports and Entertainment Organizations

On episode 195 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with David Brickley, Founder and CEO, STN Digital.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 195: How David Brickley and STN Digital Drive Social Media Strategy and Meaningful Results

Listen to episode 195 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with David Brickley, Founder and CEO, STN Digital.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

56 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

Episode 194: Best Of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast: Content Strategy, Team Marketing, ESPN NHL, MLB Social, and More

Listen to episode 194 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, Best Of episodes 130-136. Included are parts of interviews with:

Episode 193: How Jamie Mottram and BreakingT Produce Real-Time Merchandise that Captures the Sports Zeitgeist

Listen to episode 193 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Jamie Mottram, President of BreakingT.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

61 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

Episode 192 Snippets: Inside What Happens When a Small College Athletics Program Takes the National Social Media Spotlight

On episode 192 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Zach Seidel, Director of Sports Marketing Communications and Digital Media, UMBC Athletics.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 192: UMBC Athletics’s Zach Seidel on Lessons for Small Schools to Seize their Moment in the Spotlight

Listen to episode 192 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Zach Seidel, Director of Sports Marketing Communications and Digital Media for UMBC Athletics.

(Yep, the school whose Men’s Basketball team beat #1 Virginia as a #16 seed in the NCAA Tournament)

68 minute duration. Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn