Episode 204: Reece Carter on the Social Media Content Strategy for Australia’s National Rugby League (NRL)

Listen to episode 204 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Reece Carter, Social Content Manager, National Rugby League (NRL).

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

79 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

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Episode 203: Best Of the Podcast — Lacrosse, College Athletics, FOS, Warriors, Satisfi, and More

Listen to episode 203 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

74 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

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How to Marry Brand and ROI in Social Media and Sports

Social media and sports pros are asked to deliver a lot. They must drive the key ‘vanity’ metrics to ensure the brand is reaching a wide audience, keep the engagement rate high in order to be attractive to sponsors, aaaand help develop new fans across generations — and do all that while building and enhancing the brand of the organization and activating their presence across a number of disparate platforms. And, oh yeah, create content and track and interpret data, too.

Yeah, it’s a lot.

The volume of demands and output requires a keen sense of brand development, and a deep understanding of each social channel. There are still some that press ‘send’ and see their content, copy, and creative plastered across platforms identically to drive up the vanity metrics; but the vast majority do not, and for good reason. I recount all this to set up the insights offered by Austin Penny, who helped develop and execute social media strategy for Auburn Athletics and Auburn Football, as well as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers — recognizing each organization’s unique goals and how to effectively execute against them across platforms, while staying true to stated brand goals and values. Penny was able to frame the discussion in clear and stark terms, noting the similarities and differences of moving from Auburn to the NFL and the Bucs.

“Everything that we did at Auburn was based around recruiting,” said Penny, who had two separate stints working at Auburn around his time with the Bucs. “At the end of the day, you’re creating content to show what it’s like to be an Auburn Tiger; [to] really give that 14 to 18 year-old the best insight of what it would be like if they came and played a sport and studied at Auburn. So that was our goal every single day is how can we create content that’s going to show that?…

“[Then] with the Bucs], it went from recruiting to revenue…”[It was] ‘let’s do our best to create content, sell [social] media, work with corporate partnerships to make sure that we’re marrying the right content to the right partner.'”

The trick is to create content worth marrying to the partners in a way that aligns with the brand that the Bucs wanted to put out there, too. A brand that fans would want to identify with and wrap their arms around, and also a brand with which sponsors would want to partner. When Penny joined the team, the Bucs were about to set sail (sorry, had to do it) on a reinvigorated brand strategy, creating a desirable brand in which fans could take pride. It’s one thing to talk about a brand, another to articulate it, and yet another to execute and convey it. Penny described the pillars that guided him and the Bucs on social media. With an identity in place, they were ready to go when moves on the football side presented an opportunity — wind in their sails, if you will.

“We had fearless, we had being piratical and really taking advantage of our mascot — who we are — [and] we had being heartfelt,” said Penny in describing the Bucs’ brand pillars. “Then you start to have these [player] signings where you’re getting Tom [Brady], you’re getting these guys and the hype is starting to build, and then you’re rolling out this new brand.

“And you can see it from [around] last February into April — the brand transition, along with the jersey change, that’s kinda what helped spur that on, and then you get a brand that is high-class. You get a brand that’s really focused on the customer service side and look how cool we are. You want to be a part of this, you definitely want to be a part of this. Look, we’re winning now. “

Penny conceded that, of course, winning makes everything easier. But even the best teams still face the challenges that every organization does in trying to be intentional about their brand — being engaging to different fan demos on different platforms. The tactics, voice, and content packaging, substance, and strategy can all differ when speaking to diverse groups of fans and on different social networks. It’s not about trying to be everything to everybody; that’s a doomed proposition. To have success on each social channel is to respect and use those differences; to understand who you’re talking to on each platform and how they like to engage there. The brand’s north star can be consistent even as it floats to different platforms; it’s not unlike how, well, real humans have distinct personalities even if the way they talk around their aunts and uncles is different from the way they talk around their friends. Penny gave a thoughtful explanation of how the Bucs looked at some of the major social platforms.

“On Twitter, we were way more engaging, we knew that we had to constantly be talking back to fans — not in a bad way, but talking back to fans and engaging with them, making them feel like they were a part of this whole thing,” said Penny, who today works as a Social Media Manager for sports digital and social marketing agency STN Digital.

“On Facebook, we started a Facebook Group for our fans and we would always be in that engaging with them, giving them opportunities for giveaways and that type of thing. So we were a little bit more not necessarily reserved, but we were more appreciative, I guess you could say, as a brand. On Instagram there were times where we were telling people to walk the plank because they were clapping at us and saying how terrible of a game we had or how bad we were, and we’re just like ‘Hey, you know what, whatever we’re coming after you at times.’”

The reason it is so necessary to have presence across a growing number of platforms is that teams and schools and sports organizations are trying to reach everybody. They’re trying to reach existing fans across a variety of sociodemographic groups, while also reaching and converting potential new fans, particularly among the younger cohorts. It’s easier said than done, however, and it’s why hitting big numbers overall is not always a clear signifier of success on social media. And it’s why such a thoughtful approach across social networks is essential.

Penny broke it down further: “It’s not necessarily about just growing platforms,” he said, “but it’s doing it the way that we know that we should — are we putting out content that our fans are actually engaging with and then, to take that a step further, how are we locking in on the 14 to 18-year-old next crop of NFL fans? Are we showing content that’s resonating with them?

“And then it’s like, okay, how are we going to do our job so we can make sure that 10 years from now we’re still able to have a job because there is that next crop of fans coming. And that’s every professional sport league…”

Penny continued, hitting on what guides social media teams in making economical decisions about how and where to deploy their limited resources.

“Every platform has its own world, really, and you may have fans or followers that follow you on every single platform and kind of going back to my earlier point about having a different voice on [each platform] that kind of gives them incentive to follow you on everything. But from actually breaking it out and figuring out where we’re going to put our resources, it’s really prioritization of the buckets of the people that we’re trying to hit.

“Every platform is going to have a key demo that you’re going to hit and once you figure that out and you kind of understand that better, you can really start to attack it, divvy up your resources better.”

There’s no one way to identify success on social media, because each organization comes with its own goals and distinct brand. The best know what they’re trying to do, they’re intentional about it. Every decision, post, and piece of content is not about what will earn the highest engagement — that’s part of it, sure — but it’s what will earn the highest engagement while helping ‘x’ goal and conveying ‘y’ brand and reaching ‘z’ audience, among a number of other letters of the alphabet representing variables.

There are a lot of pathways to earning the engagement and impressions that many use to measure success, but the routes and destinations are unique to each organization. Every strategy needs to start by mapping out the routes and destinations that make sense for them. Don’t ever lose or forget the compass, it’s the only way to get where you need to go.

LISTEN TO MY FULL CONVERSATION WITH AUSTIN PENNY

Episode 202 Snippets: Inside Digital and Social Strategy from the lens of Auburn and the Tampa Bay Bucs

On episode 202 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Austin Penny, Social Media Manager for STN Digital.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 202: Austin Penny on the Strategies of Brand Building in Social Media and Sports

Listen to episode 202 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Austin Penny, Social Media Manager, STN Digital.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

79 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

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Episode 201 Snippets: Keys to Engaging, Value-Producing Content for the Chicago Bulls and Beyond

On episode 201 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Joe Pinchin, Manager of Digital Content for the Chicago Bulls.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 201: How Joe Pinchin Brings Passion to the Chicago Bulls Brand and Fans on Digital and Social

Listen to episode 201 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Joe Pinchin, Manager, Digital Content for the Chicago Bulls NBA team.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

83 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

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Episode 200 Snippets: Teri Horowitz on Becoming a Sports Fan and Engaging with SMSports

On episode 200 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Teri Horowitz, Neil’s mom and avid Anaheim Ducks fan, about how she went from non-sports fan to Ducks diehard, how she engages with the team, and more.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.

Episode 200: How Teri Horowitz (Neil’s mom) Went from 0 to 100 as a NHL Fan as How She Consumes + Engages

Listen to episode 200 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast, in which Neil chatted with Teri Horowitz, Neil’s mom and avid Anaheim Ducks fan, about how she went from non-sports fan to Ducks diehard, how she engages with the team, and more.

Listen below or on Apple, Spotify and Stitcher.

67 minute duration. Listen on Apple, Spotify or Stitcher.

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Episode 199 Snippets: Inside the Complexities of Sports Social Media Strategy

On episode 199 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Jeramie McPeek, Founder and Principal – Jeramie McPeek Communications, 24years with the Phoenix Suns NBA team.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Spotify or Stitcher.