Episode 145 Snippets: Josh Wetzel on Enhancing the Auburn Brand and Managing a Busy Creative Team

On episode 145 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Josh Wetzel, Digital Media Specialist for Auburn Athletics.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher.

The Answer to Why Sports? for Sponsors

Ever since there have been sports, there have been sports partnerships. The admission to sporting events held at the Roman Coliseum was typically free – often sponsored by Roman politicians looking to curry favor with the public.

The forms of entertainment and things that capture public attention has multiplied exponentially since the days of Ancient Rome, as have the ways for people – or, more commonly these days, businesses and brands – to activate a partnership. Yet, sports remains at the center of sponsorship. And sports teams and leagues now operate extensive ecosystems of partners that deliver tangible and intangible value for the businesses that pay millions for the right to co-mingle with a league, its teams, and its fans.

At the recent Leaders Week conference, Rahul Kadavakolu, Executive Director of international brand and prominent sports sponsor Rakuten, beautifully articulated three key factors behind why a brand like Rakuten chooses to invest as a partner in sports, all strengthened by the unique, powerful emotional ties that bind fans (consumers) to their favorite teams and athletes, and to the brands with whom they partner.

Brand Awareness

It has been well-documented that sports remains one of the best ways to reach masses of engaged, attentive eyeballs on a consistent basis. And that’s why you see brands – big and small – investing in sports to help get their name out there. YouTube TV plastered themselves all over the World Series and now finds themselves on the jerseys of Major League Soccer club LAFC, while everyone that follows hockey now knows PPG Paints thanks to them putting their name on the Pittsburgh Penguins’s home arena. And it’s why Elk Grove Village continues to sponsor the ‘Makers Wanted’ Bowl, and even why an international powerhouse brand like Rakuten, seeking more US awareness, finds themselves on the Golden State Warriors jerseys and spending money on a clever Super Bowl ad. Impressions and eyeballs may be softer metrics, when awareness is the KPI, the scale and engagement that sports offers is a helluva value prop for partners.

Brand Preference

In less crowded industries, the frequency of impressions and awareness detailed in the last point can drive business simply because, well, they may not know a ton of paint brands off their top of their head, but PPG Paints sticks with them. Then, in verticals where more options are more well-known, sports represents an avenue to drive consumer preference. This happens a number of ways we see every day in sports sponsorship – demonstrations, free sampling, first time trials or discounts, team-branded products, and players/teams using the product or service themselves. The emotions play a role, too, as many fans will opt for one brand over another simply because they do sponsor their favorite player or team. It’s why sponsors love NASCAR, in which 65% of fans surveyed were more likely to consider a product or service if they see it’s the “Official ‘x’ of NASCAR.” And perhaps all those fans of ‘Dub Nation’ will bookmark Rakuten on their browser or in their minds instead of opting for Amazon.

Brand Extension

This is a quickly emerging element of sports partnerships – as sponsors of the same team or league congregate together, learn from each other with how they’re activating their partnerships, and often find and activate upon synergies or co-branded activations. It’s why you’re starting to see more teams host sponsorship summits the last few years and multi-brand promotions like a sweepstakes that involve purchasing a Coca-Cola product at a Pilot Flying J or perhaps even a company like Rakuten offering a discount on a fan’s next purchase of a Nike product on their site (both of these are hypothetical examples). Brand extension means partners can be so much more than the sum of their parts when they work together to win over the fans’ hearts, minds….and wallets. And sports offers entry into a community of sponsors unlike any other avenue.

 

Many of us who have worked in sports business don’t know it without sponsorship comprising a key piece of the pie. RFP’s come in, deals are renewed or reworked over decades, and certain categories continue to spend a huge portion of their marketing budgets on sports partnerships. And it was illuminating to hear from one of the world’s biggest companies on what makes sports special for them. So, why sports? I encourage you to watch the full video snippet below and you’ll understand the answer to that question.

 

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Finding the Storylines for Social Media Every NFL Season Regardless of Win-Loss Record

It’s always easier when the team is winning. The engagement rate goes up, the growth surges, and it seems like every post and piece of content performs.

But, as anyone that works in sports business knows, counting on a winning is not a strategy. Brandon Naidus knows this all too well. Naidus led social media for the Arizona Cardinals and Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL, but ignominiously never experienced a season with a team better than .500. So, yeah, he knows a thing or two about social media strategy without the benefit of a winning team. It’s the challenging times, however, that reveal the roots of why fans care for the team, and how social strategy ultimately comes to down stories.

Naidus learned quickly as he got going in Jacksonville. The Jags weren’t winning a lot, but Naidus knew there were things happening on the field every game giving fans reason to cheer, and the team was in a good position to use social media to augment and frame the story they wanted to tell about a young, talented team on the rise.

“When you have those disappointing seasons, the focus then becomes what are your storylines?,” said Naidus, who noted the Jags had exciting players like wide receivers Allen Hurns and Allen Robinson to go with just-drafted 1st round quarterback Blake Bortles. “It was the story of telling the story of this young team…It was an exciting time in the sense that those guys were putting up big numbers.”

It was a much different story when Naidus got to Arizona – the Cardinals were perennial contenders and weren’t far removed from coming oh-so-close to winning a Super Bowl. They were poised, and picked by many, to make another deep playoff run the season Naidus arrived. But seasons don’t always go as predicted. Losses and injuries piled up, and Naidus and the social media team had to scramble a bit out of the pocket.

“So people were kind of (saying) their window is closed, so the optimism was definitely down,” he said as the team began to fall short of the preseason positive expectations. “It’s – ‘What are people talking about that we can talk about?’ 2016 it was [running back] David Johnson, 2017 it was [linebacker] Chandler Jones.

Most sports biz pros will agree that even the angriest, loudest fan base is better than a silent one. And Naidus noted that the fans were indeed vocal, but not all positive. So, he had to be savvy when activating storylines on social. You still work for the team and want to portray your players and team in the best light possible, because those are the players you work with every day on content, too.

“Obviously, there are other things they’re talking about that we’re not going to talk about” he explained. “…I always try to lean toward being as positive as possible, because you always have to have those relationships within the organization…”

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Every season will have its winning teams and its losing teams, its pleasant surprise teams and those that disappoint. The playing field is further affected by varying sizes, budget, and overall resources for social media teams. But most coaches will tell you that you have to worry about your own team first, to get the most out of your players, resources, and stories. And that’s how Naidus approached social media strategy with his clubs, executing a successful game plan that fit their teams, their goals, and their fans. It’s your team’s story to own, to tell, and to craft the best way you can.

“I think the best thing you can use analytics for is how to implement in your own strategy rather than comparing yourself to everybody else…” said Naidus. “I think every team has different objectives and different resources [which can skew comparing with other teams, even more so when team performance is accounted for].”

Every team enters the season with plans to go 16-0 and then make a run to the Super Bowl, right? But, for the love of David Tyree, no team has yet completed that goal. So the only thing we can count on is our ability to find and craft stories worth telling. That transcends wins and losses.

LISTEN TO MY FULL INTERVIEW WITH BRANDON NAIDUS

Episode 143 Snippets: How Brandon Naidus Built Social Strategy for the Jaguars and Cardinals

On episode 143 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Brandon Naidus, Digital Communications for the City of Orlando.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher.